WINDFARMS: No threat to wildlife

Middlemoor wind farm, just north of Alnwick.
Middlemoor wind farm, just north of Alnwick.
  • EDITOR’S NOTE: All of the 18 turbines of Middlemoor are within Eglingham Parish, while Wandylaw is in Ellingham Parish and borders Eglingham, which is what the article stated. The image was a photograph taken by the Gazette photographer Jane Coltman

I am the enthusiastic owner of the Bewick Moor Site of Scientific Interest. It has been developed in consultation with my family and I.

We have known about the windfarm plans, as have Rural England, since the turn of the century and my late husband, who was the first chairman of the Farming and Wildlife Advisory Group (FWAG) for Northumberland, took great pride and intense regard to the threat of turbines to Border wildlife.

There was good evidence that such developments have no bad effect and probably help both flora and fauna to grow in numbers.

This is akin to the Otterburn Moors, where the Ministry of Defence activity does much to protect the diversity there.

Northumberland and especially our estate has an abundance of such interest with the great-crested newt, orchids, autumn gentian, to name just three, while things are so often being destroyed by over-cutting of wild places.

It is odd that a village which is in a protected area of national beauty and in receipt of a five-figure sum annually from the wind-turbine company, has been covered in horrible white-and-black flags, at the time of year when the village is full of aubrietia in its walls, and spring blossoms on trees and gardens, just when the tourists are arriving for Easter and the May holiday weekends.

These have been a terrible eyesore for two months.

The article last week was wrong, there are no wind turbines in Eglingham parish, both Middlemoor and Wandylaw are in the parish of Ellingham.

I know as I was their county councillor for over 15 years and was always in receipt of the electoral rolls during that time.

The other inaccuracy is computer-drawn images like yours in last week’s paper, gives an inaccurate image of the present area which is actually about 18 miles from Alnwick.

There is a habit of over egging the story nowadays.

I have been enjoying walking and driving on our high ground for 58 years and was chairman of Eglingham Parish Council for about 10 years as well as representing the village from 1966 in the district councils. It is the fact that there are none of the old families in the village, everyone is a newcomer.

There is still one other threat to Northumberland and that is fracking.

I have been persuaded that it may not be dangerous giving earthquakes but the House of Lords actually said: ‘Do it in Northumberland where there is no population.’

I have been researching this and a lot of water has to be pumped into the rocks to fracture which requires thousand of lorries of the large kind bringing the water in, and then removing it, plus all the drilled out debris and it goes on for years. These sites are horrible. Do the people of Eglingham really want this going on through their village for access for at least five years?

This degree of lorry traffic will make any generated by the windmill companies like a small farm harvest.

Anne Wrangham,

By email

EDITOR’S NOTE: All of the 18 turbines of Middlemoor are within Eglingham Parish, while Wandylaw is in Ellingham Parish and borders Eglingham, which is what the article stated. The image was a photograph taken by the Gazette photographer Jane Coltman.