WATCH: The Old Lifeboat House on Holy Island opens after £1.37m restoration project

The long history of lifeboat rescues on Holy Island has been preserved.

The Old Lifeboat House, opposite St Cuthbert's Isle, has been restored and officially opened.

Dick Patterson, from the Holy Island of Lindisfarne Developmen tTrust, Jane Crossman and Ellen Creighton, from the Heritage Lottery Fund, at the opening of the Old LIfeboat House on Holy Island. Picture by Jane Coltman

Dick Patterson, from the Holy Island of Lindisfarne Developmen tTrust, Jane Crossman and Ellen Creighton, from the Heritage Lottery Fund, at the opening of the Old LIfeboat House on Holy Island. Picture by Jane Coltman

The Peregrini Lindisfarne Landscape Partnership restoration project has been carried out with the support £1.37million of Heritage Lottery Funding and now contains interpretation boards telling the story of lifeboat rescues.

The lifeboat house was officially opened on Friday by Jane Crossman, daughter-in-law of Lady Rose Crossman, who was a major benefactor on Holy Island.

Before cutting the ribbon, Mrs Crossman thanked all the volunteers "who have done so much in order to make this a fantastic part of Holy Island."

At the opening, Dick Patterson, from the Holy Island of Lindisfarne Community Development Trust, said: "It's 50 years since our lifeboat was taken out of service by the RNLI. The memories have faded a bit but I think this might revive the memories of the lifeboat crews, men and women and the 10 lifeboats that have been stationed on the island."

Jane Crossman opened The Old LIfeboat House on Holy Island. Picture by Jane Coltman

Jane Crossman opened The Old LIfeboat House on Holy Island. Picture by Jane Coltman

Ellen Creighton, from the Heritage Lottery Fund, said the opening was a chance to say thanks to the National Lottery players who made it possible for the Heritage Lottery Fund to award the funding to Peregrini Lindisfarne.

She said: "The lifeboat house project epitomises what Peregrini Lindisfarne is about and that is organisations, communities and people working together to protect, conserve, share and celebrate what's probably lesser known heritage on Holy Island so it's important."

The interpretation within the building has been funded through the HLF and the Holy Island of Lindisfarne Community Development Trust.

The local community has been heavily involved in the project, telling stories of family members who were part of the history of lifeboat rescues, and have contributed hundred of hours in researching and writing up the information.

Carol and Russell Eggleton, of Abound Design, created the display boards. Picture by Jane Coltman

Carol and Russell Eggleton, of Abound Design, created the display boards. Picture by Jane Coltman