Northumberland Estates to 'move on' after London housing plans rejected

A bid by Northumberland Estates to bulldoze a ‘green paradise’ to make way for new homes in London has been refused in the face of substantial opposition.

Monday, 18th October 2021, 1:11 pm
Campaigners had previously protested against the development.

The Duke of Northumberland’s development company wanted to redevelop an allotments site in Isleworth to make way for 80 flats.

Hounslow Council planning officers had recommended approval of the scheme, which proposed alternative allotments space on the Duke’s nearby Syon House estate.

However, planning committee members voted against it on Thursday night.

Park Road Allotments.

Northumberland Estates director Colin Barnes said: ‘The decision is extremely disappointing and a lost opportunity both to provide affordable homes and health workers with housing while retaining allotments. We will move on.”

More than 900 people objected to the development of the three-acre site, while a petition of over 3,000 signatories has rejected the development of the site or the relocation of allotments now, or at any time in the future.

It is the second time that Northumberland Estates’ plans for the site have been rejected.

The decision was welcomed by the Park Road Allotment Association who hope Northumberland Estates will now admit defeat.

Park Road Allotments in London.

Cllr Salman Shaheen, member for Isleworth, said: “I am overjoyed that my colleagues on Hounslow Council planning committee rightly threw out the Duke of Northumberland’s plans to bulldoze Park Road Allotments. They have voted to preserve a green paradise that has been worked by the people of Isleworth for over a century.”

Annie Aloysius, who has a plot on the site, added: “We understand how frustrating this is for the Estates but… we really hope to be able to work together to find a mutually acceptable solution so that we can continue to cultivate and grow.”

The campaign to save Park Road Allotments, which is thought to be part of Isleworth’s heritage as a market garden, growing vegetables and fruit for the City of London, was supported by The Isleworth Society.

Its chairman Sue Casey said: “We are delighted that the arguments of individuals and groups locally, regionally and nationally were listened to. The Isleworth Society is passionate about preserving the area’s local open spaces and we believe the councillors made the right decision.”

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