Hope for a final solution to cars stranded in seawater

One of the signs on Holy Island encouraging people to check the tide times for the causeway.
One of the signs on Holy Island encouraging people to check the tide times for the causeway.

The days of cars sitting four-feet-deep in the sea on the Holy Island Causeway may be numbered after warning signs were erected this week.

In February this year, the Gazette broke the news that action was to be taken to prevent costly rescues.

The signs idea came from meetings of a working group, which included islanders and councillors. The group was set up following a public meeting on the island in August 2011, held in response to 15 people being rescued from the causeway in the first half of last year.

A successful trial of the warning signs was held during the Easter holidays, and now the permanent, solar-powered Variable Agile Display signs, have been installed on the causeway ahead of the schools’ half-term holiday next week.

The signs will be remotely controlled and can display a number of different messages.

Ryan Douglas, station officer for Holy Island Coastguard, said: “The coastguard will support any measures that help reduce or eradicate the problem of tourists that become trapped on Holy Island Causeway.

“The trial of the signs at Easter was most promising with no strandings over the whole of the Easter school holidays. However, this year we have seen more than a 50 per cent reduction in the amount of cars stranded on the causeway without the signs.”

Coun Pat Scott, who chaired the working group, said she was delighted at the outcome.