Homes bid on farm outside Northumberland coastal village

Looking up towards Mount Pleasant Farm from the bottom of the hill out of Alnmouth.
Looking up towards Mount Pleasant Farm from the bottom of the hill out of Alnmouth.

A scheme to replace ‘unsightly’ agricultural buildings with five new homes in the countryside outside Alnmouth has been submitted.

An outline application for the development, at Mount Pleasant Farm off the Foxton Road, has been lodged with Northumberland County Council.

The access into Mount Pleasant Farm off Foxton Road.

The access into Mount Pleasant Farm off Foxton Road.

The site consists of a farmhouse and other buildings accessed by a private road off the route heading north out of Alnmouth.

According to a planning statement, the applicant is ‘keen to demolish the unsightly agricultural buildings and replace them with five dwellings’.

It adds: ‘It is considered that the proposal takes full account of the character of the surrounding area by designing a building that would sit comfortably within its traditional surroundings, and would be an attractive, sensitive addition to both the townscape and wider landscape of this part of Alnmouth.’

The five homes would be in one block and there would be a one-storey, two-bedroom unit; three one-and-a-half-storey, two-bedroom properties; and a two-storey, three-bedroom dwelling.

Plans for the demolition of the agricultural buildings and the construction of three holiday cottages were approved in 2011, but they were never implemented and the permission has now lapsed.

The new application says that ‘the current plans submitted very much reflect the scale and character of this permission’.

The site is in the area of outstanding natural beauty, but outside both the village’s settlement boundary and conservation area.

A heritage statement says: ‘The existing site has been used historically for agricultural purposes. Some of the buildings on the site are unsightly and falling into disrepair.

‘Given the distance between the site and the boundary of the conservation area, it is considered that the development would not have a direct impact but it could affect its character and setting.’

However, it highlights both the previous permission and the new homes at the boys’ club site (much closer to the conservation area) as well as the fact that the proposals are for small and traditionally designed units to conclude that it would not have a negative impact.

Ben O'Connell, Local Democracy Reporting Service