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Green light for new home plan

The site of the proposed new home in Longhorsley, which is bordered by a stone wall and trees.
The site of the proposed new home in Longhorsley, which is bordered by a stone wall and trees.

A new home on undeveloped land in the centre of a Northumberland village has been given the green light by councillors.

However, while planning permission has been granted for a detached, four-bedroom property at Kirkups Corner in Longhorsley, for the scheme to go ahead, the site would have to be de-registered as a village green.

The site of the proposed new home in Longhorsley, which is bordered by a stone wall and trees.

The site of the proposed new home in Longhorsley, which is bordered by a stone wall and trees.

The proposal was originally for two houses on the site, but it was reduced to one on the advice of planners, who then recommended the bid should be approved at Monday night’s Castle Morpeth Local Area Council.

Speaking at the meeting, Peter Kerr, who lives across East Road from the site, said that his main concern was privacy, with bedroom windows in the proposed home set to overlook his own.

He also referred to the visual impact of the eight-metre-high frontage and that it would not be in keeping with the conservation area, adding: “I suggest this is more about maximising profit than appropriate development.”

Planning officer Ryan Soulsby explained that the distance between Mr Kerr’s property and the side elevation of the proposed new house was 18 metres. Plus, a condition has been attached that these windows must be fitted with obscure glazing.

On the subject of village-green status, councillors were told that it was not a material planning consideration, but the applicant would have to apply separately to the Secretary of State to de-register the land.

Coun David Bawn said: “It strikes me as odd that this application has come forward with the need for deletion of village green, which is practically impossible, but on the planning grounds in front of us, I’m happy to support the recommendation.”

Coun Richard Dodd added that based on his experience with village greens, he felt that ‘someone is being fooled here’.

Coun John Beynon said: “I’m also concerned about the applicant coming back in the future to put a second property on there. To squeeze a building of that size in an area like that is inappropriate.”

The plans were approved by six votes to one with one abstention.

Ben O'Connell, Local Democracy Reporting Service