Northumberland Camera Club

Unlikely to be on their menu though is this strange looking thing that Tim Catterall asked if anyone knew what it was. It is a Pale Tussock Moth Caterpillar. They can cause severe allergic reactions if you touch them, so dont be tempted to pick one up.

I had a real treat this week chatting over a coffee with renowned local wildlife photographer Alan Hewitt, who was just back from an assignment in Kenya.

Next week’s article will be an interview with him.

Peter Arris, who captured this Tree Sparrow one and highlighted their shocking decline in numbers.

Most photographers I meet have a passion for wildlife and conservation, and fauna has featured a lot this past fortnight in the Northumberland Camera Club.

David Jenkins, a regular contributor to the club’s Facebook page, photographed a great black-backed gull perched atop the lighthouse at the end of Amble pier.

Another regular, Barry Mcalle, got a great shot of a rather muddy looking young grey heron. Although a common site here along the riverbanks and lakes, they are timid and are hard to get close enough to for a photograph.

Anth Wheeler captured a kingfisher. Their bright colours make them a great subject to photograph, but getting near to these birds also requires stealth and patience.

Stan Wilcox captured these two Red Admirals. They are a success story with numbers having risen this year. Many other butterfly species are still in steep decline.

Equally as shy are redshank. Julia Ewart did excellent work getting a well composed action shot.

During the spring, seed eaters like the female house sparrow, pictured by Dave Henderson, will take caterpillars to feed their young, as will the tree sparrow. Peter Arris captured one on camera and highlighted their shocking decline in numbers.

Unlikely to be on their menu though is the strange looking thing that Tim Catterall asked if anyone knew what it was. It is a pale tussock moth caterpillar. They can cause severe allergic reactions if you touch them so don’t be tempted to pick one up.

Stan Wilcox captured two red admirals. They are a success story, with numbers having risen this year. Many other butterfly species are still in steep decline.

Julia Ewart did excellent work getting this well composed action shot.

Finally, another predator that will make lunch out of a butterfly is a spider. A perfectly captured web, illuminated by a ray of sunlight through the trees, was pictured by Joanne Easton.

l Everyone is welcome to join Northumberland Camera Club.

Post images to http://bit.ly/PicNland and tag them #PicNorthumberland, giving some background about your inspiration.

You can also email photographs to northumberland.gazette@jpress.co.uk using the same tag.

This perfectly captured web illuminated by a ray of sunlight through the trees was by Joanne Easton.

David Jenkins, a regular contributor to the clubs Facebook page, photographed this great black-backed gull perched atop the lighthouse at the end of Amble pier.

During the spring, seed eaters like this female house sparrow shot by Dave Henderson will take caterpillars to feed their young.

Barry Mcalle, got a great shot of this rather muddy looking young grey heron. Although a common site here along the riverbanks and lakes, they timid and are hard to get close enough to for a photograph.

Anth Wheeler captured a kingfisher. Their bright colours make them a great subject to photograph, but getting near to these birds also requires stealth and patients.

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