FILM REVIEW: Big Hero 6

Big Hero 6. Picture: PA Photo/Disney.
Big Hero 6. Picture: PA Photo/Disney.

Big Hero 6 (PG), Disney animation, screening at Berwick Maltings all half-term week

Never underestimate the soothing power of a hug. With one simple squish, you can provide comfort, encouragement or a simple how-do-you-do that transcends a thousand well-chosen words.

Undated Film Still Handout from Big Hero 6. Pictured: Hiro and Baymax. See PA Feature FILM Film Reviews. Picture credit should read: PA Photo/Disney. WARNING: This picture must only be used to accompany PA Feature FILM Film Reviews.

Undated Film Still Handout from Big Hero 6. Pictured: Hiro and Baymax. See PA Feature FILM Film Reviews. Picture credit should read: PA Photo/Disney. WARNING: This picture must only be used to accompany PA Feature FILM Film Reviews.

Big Hero 6 is the cinematic equivalent of a warm hug, embracing the old-fashioned family values of the Walt Disney brand alongside cutting-edge computer technology that audiences now expect to dazzle their senses.

Directors Don Hall and Chris Williams marry dizzying action sequences that look even more spectacular in 3D to an emotionally rich story of a lonely boy’s unshakeable bond with his self-inflating robot protector.

The inquisitive automaton Baymax is the stuff that sweet celluloid dreams are made of: tender, loving and unwittingly hilarious.

Every child will want their own marshmallow man to snuggle at night and keep them safe from the harsh realities of modern life that weigh heavily on the film’s grief-stricken adolescent hero.

‘I see no evidence of physical injury,’ informs the robot as he scans the boy’s body.

‘It’s a different kind of hurt,’ laments the teenager.

Fourteen-year-old Hiro Hamada (voiced by Ryan Potter) idolises his older brother Tadashi (Daniel Henney), who is a star pupil of Professor Robert Callaghan (James Cromwell), head of the robotics program at San Fransokyo University.

A fire on campus culminates in tragedy and shell-shocked Hiro is inconsolable until his brother’s greatest creation, a personal healthcare robot called Baymax (Scott Adsit), helps the teenager to confront his loss.

As the boy discovers Baymax’s functionality, he also stumbles upon a secret: the fire might not have been an accident.

Indeed, a greedy entrepreneur called Alistair Krei (Alan Tudyk) might have started the blaze.

Aided by Tadashi’s loyal friends GoGo (Jamie Chung), Wasabi (Damon Wayans Jr), Honey Lemon (Genesis Rodriguez) and Fred (TJ Miller) plus an upgraded Baymax, Hiro resolves to discover the truth about the deadly inferno.

Based on an obscure title from the Marvel Comics universe, Big Hero 6 is a rip-roaring opening salvo in a potential new franchise.

Directors Hall and Williams orchestrate the requisite thrilling set pieces with brio, including an unconventional dash through the undulating streets of San Fransokyo that knowingly flouts traffic laws.

‘There are no red lights in a car chase!’ squeals GoGo.

The animators and script never lose sight of the central relationship of Hiro and Baymax, sketching that bond in exquisitely deft strokes.

Grown men will be choking back tears.

Big Hero 6 is preceded by Patrick Osborne’s Oscar-nominated short Feast, which charts the relationship between a Boston terrier and his master from puppyhood to middle age in a series of vignettes.

It’s a pick of the animated litter that leaves an indelible mark on the heart, just like Hall’s and Williams’ turbo-charged main feature.

Big Hero 6: Animated sci-fi action starring the voices of Ryan Potter, Scott Adsit, Daniel Henney, TJ Miller, Jamie Chung, Damon Wayans Jr, Genesis Rodriguez, James Cromwell and Alan Tudyk.

Read a behind-the-scenes preview of the new Disney film.

Screening at Berwick Maltings this half-term:

2.30pm, Saturday, February 14

5pm, Sunday, February 15

2.30pm, Monday, February 16

2.30pm, Tuesday, February 17

2.30pm, Wednesday, February 18

2.30pm, Thursday, February 19

7.30pm, Friday, February 20

5pm, Saturday, February 21

2.30pm, Sunday, February 22.