Pride, delight and honour for Fifth Fusiliers as impressive Colours unveiled

Captain Antony Bryant, adjutant for the 5th Battalion The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers holds the new Colours. Picture by Chris Hall.

Captain Antony Bryant, adjutant for the 5th Battalion The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers holds the new Colours. Picture by Chris Hall.

  • Presentation starts at 1pm
  • March through town begins at 2.30pm
  • Laying-up ceremony at 3pm
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Standing proud, Captain Antony Bryant holds the impressive new Colours which will be presented to a North-East-based battalion in Alnwick on Saturday, in what will be a historic occasion.

It is the first time that the 5th Battalion The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers, which has a reconnaissance platoon in the town, will receive such an honour.

The Duke of Kent, Colonel-in-Chief of the Royal Regiment of Fusiliers, will be presenting the new Colours

The Duke of Kent, Colonel-in-Chief of the Royal Regiment of Fusiliers, will be presenting the new Colours

The Duke of Kent, who is Colonel-in-Chief of the Royal Regiment of Fusiliers, will be doing the honours at Alnwick Castle, on behalf of the Queen.

The momentous day will include a march through the town, before the old standards, known as Colours, of the 5th and 6th Battalion, will be laid to rest in St Michael’s Church.

The community is being urged to support this major chapter in the Regiment’s history by lining the streets for the march, which will feature the Band of the Royal Regiment of Fusiliers.

Captain Antony Bryant, adjutant for the 5th Fusiliers, said: “As I hold the Colours, it occurs to me that this is the culmination of years of preparation for all of the Fifth Fusiliers who are based all over the world.

On Saturday, all eyes will be focused on Alnwick when new Colours are presented to us for the first time in our history

Captain Antony Bryant, adjutant for Fifth Fusiliers

“On Saturday, all eyes will be focused on Alnwick when new Colours are presented to us for the first time in our history.

“This will be a huge honour and we feel incredibly proud that we are being presented them in Alnwick; a town we feel incredibly affiliated to.

“We want the community to be a part of this and we would encourage spectators to line the route of the march through Alnwick.

“We take this very seriously and we could not be preparing and practising more for the parade and ceremony.”

Lord James Percy, Honorary Colonel of the 5th Battalion The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers, is set to attend.

Lord James Percy, Honorary Colonel of the 5th Battalion The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers, is set to attend.

The presentation of the new Colours will be staged in the Outer Bailey of Alnwick Castle. The Battalion will be on parade from 12.55pm and the Duke of Kent will arrive at 1pm to begin the presentation service.

Lord James Percy, who is the Honorary Colonel of the 5th Battalion The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers, is set to attend. The presentation is to conclude at 2pm and will be followed by the march at 2.30pm, which will start from Greenwell Road and proceed through the town centre to St Michael’s Church on Bailiffgate, where it will arrive at 2.45pm.

Northern Gas Networks has confirmed that the Hotspur Tower, which has been closed for mains repairs, will be reopened ahead of the march.

The laying-up ceremony, which means that the old Colours will no longer be used for ceremonial events, starts at 3pm and will last 45 minutes. The old Colours will stay at the church after they have been laid to rest.

Troops from the Fifth Fusiliers preparing for the parade.

Troops from the Fifth Fusiliers preparing for the parade.

There are no tickets left for the church service or the presentation of Colours at the castle, although spectators wishing to see this can pay normal castle admission. Invited guests and spectators are to be in position at the Outer Bailey by 12.45pm.

Colours are large brocade and embroidery flags which were carried into battle so soldiers could see where their unit was, as well as being used as a rallying point during battle. While no longer carried in battle, they constitute the symbol of a Battalion’s or Regiment’s honour. They are held in the greatest esteem by soldiers and officers and are brought out on important parades/regimental occasions.

○ Last week, we printed incorrect times for the presentation and march. We apologise for any confusion caused.