More contemporary news excerpts

Archives week 38
Archives week 38

The seventh in our series of excerpts from the Alnwick and County Gazette in 1914.

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 1914

NAVAL DISASTER

THREE BRITISH CRUISERS SUNK

The Secretary of the Admirality communicates the following statement for publication: H.M. Ships Aboukir (Captain John E. Drummond), Hogue (Captain Wilmot S. Nicholson, And Cressy (Captain Robert W. Johnson) have been sunk by submarines in the North Sea.

The Aboukir was torpedoed, and whilst the Hogue and the Cressy had closed and were standing by to save the crew, they were also torpedoed.

A considerable number were saved by H.M.S Lowestoft (Captain Theobald W. B. Kennedy), and by a division of destroyers, trawlers, and boats.

Lists of casualties will be published as soon as they are known.

The Cressy, Aboukir and Hogue were sister ships; armoured cruisers of a comparatively old type, built fourteen years ago. They were of 12,000 tons and 18 knots speed, and carried two 9.2 inch and twelve 6 inch guns.

TWO SUBMARINES REPORTED SUNK

A Ymuiden message says: The British cruisers were attacked by five German submarines.

Other British cruisers and torpedo-boats rushed to the scene of the fight and succeeded in destroying two of the enemy submarines.

LORD PERCY LEAVES FOR THE FRONT

The tenantry of the Duke of Northumberland’s estate, hearing that Earl Percy was leaving Southampton on Thursday for the front, immediately communicated with Sir Francis Walker, Commissioner, asking him to wire their good wishes to his lordship at Southampton.

The following reply was received from Sir Francis Walker on Friday morning:–

On receipt of your post card I telegraphed as follows: “On behalf of the tenantry I am requested to telegraph you wishing you all good luck and safe return.

“All connected with the estate desire also to join in these good wishes,” and have received the following telegram:– “Please thank the tenantry and others connected with Estate for their very kind message, which I appreciate most deeply,”

NORTHUMBERLAND YEOMANRY IN CAMP

A Newcastle gentleman, who has two sons with the Northumberland Yeomanry in Hampshire, has received letters from them, in which they are loud in their praises of the beauties of the New Forest and of the fine bodies of regular troops encamped near them.

One of the sons writes:– “We are in a most beautiful country. For sheer unspoiled beauty the scenery is almost indescribable and makes you say old England is worth all the fighting for.

“The troops here are the finest lot of men you ever saw. The work is hard, and if the grub is not of the best we are very fit on it.

“A more happy-go-lucky troop than ours would be hard to find.”