DCSIMG

Coppicing on the comeback trail in the Cheviot Hills

Bringing coppicing back to life  the recent Heritage Craft Alliance course at Kirk Newton was a huge success.

Bringing coppicing back to life the recent Heritage Craft Alliance course at Kirk Newton was a huge success.

An early form of woodland management has been given a new lease of life, thanks to a partnership between a Northumberland National Park project and a craft alliance.

A recent two-day coppicing course, run by the Sill project and Bedale-based Heritage Craft Alliance Ltd, was held in ancient woodland near the village of Kirknewton in the Cheviot Hills.

And the event was oversubscribed – proving that there is still demand for this Neolithic pastime more than 6,000 years since it first began.

As a form of forestry which is based on the harvesting of woodland, this Defra-supported practical coppicing course has helped to preserve an important rural habitat in Northumberland National Park, opening up the dense canopy to support many species of wildlife. Plus it offered a special training opportunity to enable people from all walks of life to develop knowledge and understanding of some of the oldest rural skills, which still have a role to play.

Georgia Villalobos, learning and participation coordinator for The Sill project, said: “Equipping people with traditional skills is so important.

“The Northumberland countryside is made up of a rich tapestry of history and heritage and it’s vital for the preservation of our infrastructure that these aspects are conserved and brought into the modern age – this is a big part of The Sill’s aim.

 

Comments

 
 

Back to the top of the page