Heavy horses make a return

The Fenton Clydesdale Show.'Anna Cockburn from the Tillside Stud at Milfield was a local competitor and here she is seen with Tillside Ready Teddy Go who was a winner in class 3.
The Fenton Clydesdale Show.'Anna Cockburn from the Tillside Stud at Milfield was a local competitor and here she is seen with Tillside Ready Teddy Go who was a winner in class 3.

A NEW Clydesdale heavy horse show, the first in the region for a long time, took place at the weekend.

The Fenton Clydesdale show, held near Wooler, saw entries across seven categories from Milfield, County Durham and Peebles in Scotland.

Anna Cockburn, from the Tillside Stud in Milfield, finished second in the gelding three years and over class with Tillside Master Whitton and was a winner in the one or two-year-old gelding/colt category with Tillside Ready Teddy Go, which was also the male champion.

The supreme champion at the show was the filly Ainville Jackie Bird, owned by John Strang.

Vivienne Cockburn, one of the organisers of the show, said: “Public support was very, very good, it was excellent.

“It’s a shame there wasn’t the quantity of horses – there aren’t that many in the country – but the ones that did come the public enjoyed very much.”

The Clydesdale breed originated in Lanarkshire in the 18th century, when Flemish stallions were imported by the sixth Duke of Hamilton to increase the pulling-power and stamina of the local horses, to benefit his tenant farmers.

The stock-breeding experiment was a great success and the Clydesdale horse rapidly became the standard workhorse throughout Scotland.