Head reacts to GCSE and A-Level league tables

Maurice Hall, headteacher of the Duchess's Community High School, Alnwick.

Maurice Hall, headteacher of the Duchess's Community High School, Alnwick.

0
Have your say

The headteacher of Alnwick’s high school has said they are delighted with many of their outcomes, in particular that it is one of only three state schools north of the Tyne to have significantly added value to both its GCSE and A-Level cohorts last year.

As reported by the Gazette, the GSCE and A-Level performance tables were released yesterday.

Duchess’s Community High School headteacher Maurice Hall said: “There have been some significant changes in how the tables are calculated for 2014 that have impacted in different ways depending on how schools have developed over the last few years. Of particular note is a significant drop in the number and types of qualification that can be counted in these tables. Alongside this change, the performance tables now only show the outcomes from the first attempt a student makes in a particular examination subject as opposed to recognising the best outcome for each student by the end of Year 11.

“In the case of the Duchess’s Community High School, this would have meant an increase from 56 per cent to 65 per cent of our students gaining at least five A* to Cs including English and maths. It would also have seen our maths-progress percentage move from 63 per cent to 73 per cent.

“As a school, we are delighted with many of our outcomes in 2014. Of real note is the data on Value Added for KS4 and KS5. The statistics (based around confidence levels) show that we are one of only three state schools north of the Tyne to have significantly added value to both our GCSE and A-Level cohorts last year.

“In times of constant change, it is very rewarding to our school community to see that we provide very good levels of progress as our students move through our school. We can’t compete in league tables such as the one seen in the Sunday Times simply because they are based entirely around attainment. Progress over time is a much fairer tool to assess the quality of a school.”