Eye-catching artwork attracts thousands

Nick Spurr with The Flow  that has been constructed at Amble Boat Company. Inside are Antony Hall, Nicholas Cook, Simon Blackmore and Ed Carter from The Owl Project.
Nick Spurr with The Flow that has been constructed at Amble Boat Company. Inside are Antony Hall, Nicholas Cook, Simon Blackmore and Ed Carter from The Owl Project.

A quirky floating artwork which was built in Amble has been visited by tens of thousands of people, far exceeding expectations.

Flow, a tidemill which uses a waterwheel to power a range of unusual musical instruments, is docked on the River Tyne close to the Gateshead Millennium Bridge.

Nick Spurr with The Flow  that has been constructed at Amble Boat Company. Inside are Antony Hall, Nicholas Cook, Simon Blackmore and Ed Carter from The Owl Project.

Nick Spurr with The Flow that has been constructed at Amble Boat Company. Inside are Antony Hall, Nicholas Cook, Simon Blackmore and Ed Carter from The Owl Project.

The eye-catching structure has been open to the public since March and 33,000 people have gone through its doors.

And with Flow officially open until September 16 – the same day as the Bupa Great North Run – that number is set to increase.

Nick Spurr, whose Amble Boat Company won the commission to construct Flow, said: “We are delighted with how many people have been through Flow’s doors. It has exceeded all expectations.”

The project was one of 12 public art commissions funded by the UK Arts Councils for the London 2012 Cultural Olympiad, put forward as a collaboration between the Owl Project and Gateshead-based art and music producer Ed Carter.

Flow is free to board.

Nick, who runs Spurreli ice-cream parlour in Amble, said that Flow is set to return to the town, at least in the short-term, when its stint in the Toon has ended, but is unsure what the long-term future holds.