Celebrating Yorkshire puds

Alnwick Arms manager Geoff Dade and landlord and chef Chris Robinson with some of their Yorkshire puddings.
Alnwick Arms manager Geoff Dade and landlord and chef Chris Robinson with some of their Yorkshire puddings.

An Alnwick pub is launching a week-long celebration on Sunday, in tribute to the humble Yorkshire pudding.

The owners of the Alnwick Arms, on Clayport Street, are celebrating the link between Northumberland and Yorkshire .

The pub is hosting a Yorkshire Pudding Week from Sunday – and there is a link to the county.

Chris Robinson and Geoff Dade, who took on the Arms last year, have found that the first published recipe for a Yorkshire pudding was written by Northumbrian Hannah Glasse, in 1747.

Hannah, from Hexham, published a book, The Art of Cookery Made Plain and Easy, which included the recipe, as well as the first recorded recipe for curry.

So Yorkshiremen Chris and Geoff decided to highlight the link between the two counties.

Their hope is that more Northumbrians will embrace the Yorkshire pudding as part of their heritage, and they are linking this by kicking off the week in a traditional way, with a Yorkshire pudding coming before the main meal.

And from Monday onwards there will be a different filling each day, inside a giant pudding.

The landlords have also set the public a challenge.

Anyone who finishes their giant pudding will receive a free dessert.

And for a special commemoration of Hannah Glasse, a homemade chicken curry in a Yorkshire pudding will be served all week.

Little attention has been paid to Hannah.

She was the illegitimate daughter of a Hexham man, and brought up with his family in Simonburn.

At the age of 16, she married an Irish soldier and moved to London.

After publishing her book in 1747, she became significantly wealthier but poor decisions led to her falling into debt and being imprisoned.

She was forced to sell the book’s copyright, and although she later wrote two more books, she never received the same success again.

She died in 1770, aged 62.

In 2006 Clarissa Dickson-Wright presented a BBC documentary about her.