BBC celebrates 50 years of Pennine Way with documentary

Paul Rose on the Pennine Way. Picture by BBC/Ant Clausen
Paul Rose on the Pennine Way. Picture by BBC/Ant Clausen
0
Have your say

The BBC will mark the 50th anniversary of the Pennine Way, including its section in Northumberland, by screening a four-part documentary next month.

The new series is presented by polar adventurer and ocean diver Paul Rose.

Pennine Way markerpost.

Pennine Way markerpost.

Paul and the team from BBC Yorkshire pulled on their hiking boots last summer to explore the 268-mile trail, which was officially opened in 1965. It stretches from Edale in the Derbyshire Peak District to Kirk Yetholm on the Scottish border.

In Northumberland, walkers follow the line of Hadrian’s Wall, taking in Sycamore Gap, which was immortalised in the film Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves, which was also filmed at Alnwick Castle, then heading north to Byrness in the Rede Valley before climbing into the Cheviot Hills to cross Carter Bar into Scotland.

Paul Rose said: “I’ve spent my life leading science expeditions to the most remote and challenging places on earth. I’ve skied across the Greenland Icecap, made first ascents of Arctic mountains and run an Antarctic Research Station. Yet right here on my doorstep is the Pennine Way – a world class challenge! Exploring the Pennine Way has been surprising, a privilege and huge amounts of fun.”

From the highest pub in England to the Roman excavations at Hadrian’s Wall and the red squirrels of Northumberland to the blustery Helm Wind of Cumbria, Paul Rose discovers the wildlife, geographical features and people that make the Pennine Way so distinctive and challenging.

Exploring the Pennine Way has been surprising, a privilege and huge amounts of fun.

The Pennine Way presenter Paul Rose

The first part of The Pennine Way will be shown on Friday, April 10 (BBC One, north of England only), at 7.30pm